• Podcasting

Episode 32: Becoming Day Byrd

Episode – 32 Summary:

On this episode of Hair Biz Radio, Hosts Zakiyrah and Mikey interview Day Byrd, makeup artist, creative director, and instructor in the beauty industry.

Show Notes:

How did you get started in the industry?
She went to a performance art high school.
The job she chose to support her acting was makeup.
She loved making people feel beautiful.
Her mother sold Mary Kay and she would play in it.
She was in love with Janet Jackson and wanted to do whatever she did.
After school her friends started getting signed and asking her to do their headshots and makeup.
Talk to us about the experience of not going to cosmetology school.
She comes from a cosmetology background.
Every time she tried to go to school she got called to go on tours and do wardrobe.
What are some things that were self-taught?
It used to be a small industry so you could work under people if you had passion.
Her passion and hunger are what attracted people to her.
How did you begin branding yourself?
She went to do makeup at Lennox and at that time they were starting a color company in Victoria’s Secret.
She chose the name Day and it just stuck.
Lesson one was figuring out who she wanted to be.
It took her a while to create a portfolio.
She had a mentor who was a costume designer.
You have to sell the package just by having people look at you.
Did building your brand help you with building your clientele?
Being an entrepreneur is one of the greatest spiritual walks you’ll ever have.
Her slogan was that makeup is her ministry.
Makeup is even more personal than hair because you’re face to face.
What are some tough times that almost made you give up?
It’s happening to her now – she got married and had a child.
A lot of women are her clients but men hired her.
When she got married a lot of the men disappeared.
It’s important to have your core crew of people who help fight with you.
You never make money alone.
The best money opportunities were when she had a group of people who all referred to one another.
You learn other ways of making money so you can give yourself time to revamp.
So many people are caught up in what’s happening that they don’t dig deep.
What are some of your favorite products?
Natural products –
Yogurt and turmeric and turmeric and vaseline are great brighteners.
She loves grapeseed oil, it’s the best moisturizer you can use.
Makeup products-
A lot of Laura Mercier – really good for TV.
Fenty for photoshoots – it’s a little heavier.
How long have you been creative directing, when did you start and what are you working on now?
She’s been doing it from the beginning and likes it better than makeup.
A lot of people don’t understand the chemistry of products.
She and her husband are starting a company called The Byrd House Group.
She wants to help people jump up a notch with what she’s learned from big brands.
What have been some of your biggest, proudest projects you’ve worked on as a creative director or makeup artists.
She’s worked with over 60 different celebrities.
She worked with Nicki Minaj.
It was fun, like walking pop-art.
How have you had to change your marketing strategy over the years?
She wasn’t really on social media working with Nicki Minaj.
Facebook is her core business, but Instagram gets her business too.
You have to know what helps you grow and what’s just a check.
What’s something that sets your courses apart?
They’re 1-1.
She’s trained a lot of makeup artists.
She wants you to understand chemistry and that makeup changes on different individuals.
Where to find her online.
@Muadaybyrd on socialmedia
daybyrd2015@gmail.com email
Daybyrd.com
The business –
When you’re charging people you need to know what the service is for.
She charges according to what the face is worth.
What’s too low of a price for full face makeup?
Nothing’s too low, it depends on what you’re getting.
It depends on the cost of the product.
If you could leave one tip, what would it be?
Find your best you and know you have something to offer.

Tweetable Quotes

“You have to be a walking billboard for your product or service.”
“Being an entrepreneur is one of the greatest spiritual walks you’ll ever have.”
“You never make money alone.”

Resources Mentioned

Day Byrd’s website

  • Podcasting

Episode 31: All About Private Label Extensions

Episode – 31 Summary:

On this episode of Hair Biz Radio, Hosts Zakiyrah and Mikey talk about how they got started in the hair industry and what Private Label Extensions has going on.

Show Notes:

– How did Mikey and his business partner get into hair?
– His business partner’s girlfriend would go and drop a ton of money at the salon.
– They knew that someone was making a lot of money.
– They looked into selling online and came up with the idea for networking marketing for hair.
– They were going to call it Luxury Hair Direct.
– The multi-level marketing model made it so people spend more time recruiting than selling.
– Talk about the business.
– Who did most of the work on the business?
– Mikey did most of the work.
– He was still working in real estate.
– It’s hard to find good people.
– Zakiyrah did a hair shoot with Luxury Hair Direct before she came to work there.
– In 2016 they came up with the idea for Private Label Extensions.
– The business began to take off.
– Dropship Bundles was born shortly after.
– In 2017 they shut down the Luxury Hair Direct model.
– If you make the barrier to entry too cheap or free with MLM, you have no investment.
– In April 2016 Mikey went full-time into the hair business.
– If you’re thinking about customizing your packaging for your hair brand, look into the custom silk bags.
– There was a lot of grinding to get where they are today.
– What Private Label is doing now.
– Just revamped the Private Label Extensions
– Just revamped Dropship Bundles
– Launched Free Business Tools
– They have terms and conditions.
– They have a new tool for labels in Canva.
– Launched their Facebook group
– Gave away six laptops to aspiring entrepreneurs.
– They gave away hair for prom and bundles in the group.
– They gave away silk bags, logos, and bonnets.
– The blog is ramping up and they’ve added to their team.
– What’s coming up?
– More free tools to help with the hair and lash businesses.
– More styles of hair, more natural hair.
– More motivation for people in the hair business and proper guidance on how to get it done.
– New studio is coming.
– Building the YouTube team.

Tweetable Quotes

“Sometimes you need someone to show you what’s possible.”
“In a startup you have to go through the ups and the downs together.”
“Years four, five, and six in your business is a really important time to stay focused and grow.”

Resources Mentioned

Private Label Extensions

  • Podcasting

Episode 30: Finding My Way In Fashion with Julian Lark

Episode – 30 Summary:

On this episode of Hair Biz Radio, Hosts Zakiyrah and Chay interview Julian Lark, fashion expert, celebrity wardrobe stylist, founder of Revel by JL and founder of Kontrol Magazine.

Show Notes:

Who is Julian and what got you started?
He’s a small town boy who used to design since he was little.
He used to create little fashion books and decided after high school to become a fashion designer.
Graduated from American Intercontinental University Buckhead.
What makes a stylist?
You have to be trained, read the magazines, know designers and live in the lifestyle.
Fashion for Julian is strategic.
You need a lot of energy.
What was your journey after college?
He waited tables and didn’t jump right into the industry.
He sat down and decided to create a magazine.
It’s not necessary to have a diploma to enter the industry.
What was your strategy for building relationships?
It’s about loving what you do.
You’re not going to get paid right away, you’ll do a lot of things for free.
Use relationships to ask as many questions as you can.
What was it like starting your magazine?
It was a learning process.
He didn’t know what he was doing when he started out.
He’s constantly learning and paying attention.
He emailed nearly every showroom he had researched to try to get in.
He’s been told no several times, but he continues to reach out.
How did Kontrol Magazine help you catapult in the fashion industry?
It’s been the biggest part of his success.
He told people they couldn’t shoot with the magazine unless he styled them.
Being genuine with people is part of what got him where he is.
The photography is what sets Kontrol Magazine apart.
What was your thought going into launching Revel by JL makeup?
They started with lipsticks and moved into shadow, stains, etc.
He did the magazine for 4-5 years before doing the magazine.
Anytime a celebrity comes in to shoot with Kontrol he uses Revel makeup.
What was one of your favorite spreads for Kontrol, or one that you loved?
Shoot with LaToya Luckett and Antoinette Robertson
Talk to us about the clothing piece of Revel?
Fashion is his number one love.
He launched online and then opened up a physical boutique in midtown.
They launched both guy and girl prints.
Everything in the store is under $100.
He handpicks everything he wants in the store.
What are two things that have stuck with you throughout the process?
Take your time, it will happen when you’re ready.
What are the dangers of expanding before you’re ready?
You don’t understand what you’re getting into.
Sometimes you have to stop and see yourself for who you are.
Remember that you can’t take everybody with you.
You have to look past family and friends and focus on who you’re working for.
How did the Lark Report come about?
Earlier this year he brought people together who he wanted to work with.
He wanted everyone to help each other build their brands.
This group of people helped him launch the Lark Report.
What’s the one thing that sets you apart in fashion?
He pays attention to details and who his client is.
He takes time to look at what people have done and elevate them to the next level.
What was your experience like going to New York fashion week?
He got into the show as an editor and wardrobe artist.
He wrote about the show and took pictures.
He got to see what’s coming as a stylist.
What was the “aha” moment you had that allowed you to grow?
He learned how to take constructive criticism.
What is your biggest client pet peeve?
Clients who want to shop on their own.
When women don’t wear underwear.
Who’s your favorite fashion designer?
High end – Dolce and Gabbana and Alexander McQueen
Kontrol is how he gets people to trust him.
Is there anything new that you’re working on?
They’re taking Kontrol in a new direction.
He’s working on a fashion planner.
Launching Seat at the Table Brunch.
Where do you see everything five years from now?
Kontrol – still putting out great content.
Julian – Speak on more panels and take Revel to the next level.
What’s one piece of advice you can give someone who wants to be in your shoes?
Find your mentor, take them to coffee.
Be honest and transparent.
Always be willing to learn.

Tweetable Quotes

-“Before you can become who you’re supposed to be, you have to do the work.”
-“Being an entrepreneur comes with a lot of sacrifice.”
-“If you don’t love what you do, it’s not the industry for you.”
-“Be willing to eat your truth.”

Resources Mentioned

@julianlark
@kontrolmag
@revelbyjl
Julian’s Website

  • Podcasting

Episode 29: Going Natural with Nene Couture

Episode – 29 Summary:

On this episode of Hair Biz Radio, Hosts Zakiyrah and Chay interview Nene Couture, the founder of Healthy Hair Gang in Atlanta,GA.

Show Notes:

– About Nene Couture
– She’s been doing hair professionally for over 15 years.
– She owned her own salon for 10 years in Macon, Georgia.
– She moved to Atlanta and started over from scratch.
– What propelled Nene to make a change?
– She was never fully satisfied, always looking to change.
– She was changing things in her salon but it wasn’t the place, it was her.
– What was your support system like in Macon?
– Her family and friends have always been very supportive of everything she’s done.
– She commuted from Macon to Atlanta for two years.
– It was hard to close her salon in Macon because she felt she was letting down her clients.
– Tell us about the route you took to becoming a stylist.
– She started working at a salon as an assistant in high school.
– Her clientele grew so much she could no longer assist.
– After college she did an apprenticeship under a licensed stylist.
– That’s how she got her license.
– She would not recommend the route of not going to school to become a stylist.
– Do you think seeing your parents growing a business helped spur you on?
– She was a born and bred entrepreneur.
– Sometimes looking at how society does things stunts our way of thinking.
– What was the transition like from owning a salon to being in a suite?
– The salon she worked in Atlanta was commission.
– She didn’t mind having a boss and wanted to learn
– Her salon previously was a booth-rent eight station salon.
– This is her first time being in a suite because she’s not ready to jump into the salon ownership world.
– She likes the intimacy of the suite environment.
– How are you learning how to be more business minded in the hair industry?
– You have to take the time to do the work.
– She does three administrative days a week.
– How did you build your clientele and brand?
– The first few years were trial and error.
– She decided to focus on her giftings and love of natural hair.
– What’s your passion behind healthy hair?
– When potential clients came in, she started realizing how damaged their hair was.
– You shouldn’t do something to your hair at the expense of your natural hair.
– Talk to us about the Healthy Hair Gang products.
– It’s been a journey and the process has taken about 8 months.
– Now the products are bigger than her and she needs a team.
– How do you know when someone needs repair hair growth serum or if they need to see a professional for more extensive health?
– Nene can only look with her eyes, but if someone needs to look at the follicle, she refers them out.
– Not all dermatologists know what they’re doing.
– When did a lot of your clients start going natural and what was your journey?
– She would start making her clients wait for relaxer.
– This happened before she moved to Atlanta.
– Tell us about the textured press method.
– She had one client who loved this method of hairstyle and Nene just gave it a name.
– Do you think videos and pictures have made a big impact on your brand?
– We live in the age where people want to see, no matter what type of industry.
– She’s just now getting reacquainted with Facebook, it seemed too personal for her.
– Facebook and Instagram are pay to play now.
– What pet peeves do you have with your clients?
– Touching your hair while i’m doing your hair.
– Not trusting.
– When someone isn’t honest about previous color, because color is chemistry.
– If a client with damaged hair comes to you, how do you tell them to manage their hair?
– If they can commit to every two weeks, that gives them a chance to see a difference.
– She tells her clients to commit to no tension and using units.
– Let’s go over the products.
– Moisturizing shampoo
– Maintenance conditioner
– The Serum
– Final piece of advice
– Take time to grow your business and figure out how to get things done.
– Preparation is everything.

Tweetable Quotes

You have to know better so you can do better.
– We don’t teach our kids enough about money and finances.
– Choose your niche and build off of that.

Resources Mentioned

-Instagram and Facebook @Nenecouturehair
-Instagram and Facebook @HealthyHairGang

  • Podcasting

Episode 28: Going Natural with Jazmine Jackson

Episode – 28 Summary:

During the 28th episode of Hair Biz Radio, Zakiyrah and Chay interview Jazmine Jackson of global beauty brand Empress Dream Doll.

Show Notes:

– How did Jazmine get into beauty?
– She’s been into hair for over 20 years.
– Her mom couldn’t afford to send her to the salon, so she learned how to do it herself.
– Her hair is natural.
– What was the transition from using relaxers to going natural?
– She used to press her hair out to get the relaxed look without a relaxer.
– What was the mindset from wanting to be a nurse to being a beauty brand.
– She wanted to help women with self-esteem, and the beauty industry has been a good outlet.
– What are some of the things you look for in a good cosmetology school.
– Name and reputation.
– Aveda was the Ivy League of cosmetology schools for her.
– Paul Mitchell was her other choice.
– What were some of the things you were self-taught that you didn’t learn in hair school.
– She had a culture shock in hair school.
– She already knew how to braid and do a quick weave.
– She learned how to use a round brush and do layering.
– Jasmine has a wig line, talk to us about the techniques you use when you do your wigs.
– She does full-lace wigs and custom handmade wigs.
– She has a unique way she does it because of the cap she uses.
– Where did you start right out of hair school?
– She had a client who got her in with her celebrity stylist.
– She went to a salon after this.
– What were the tips from your first job you’ve taken with you?
– Speed.
– Tell us about your hair product line.
– She used to put a raw egg in her hair, she had a friend who was a chemist who helped her create her Eggcellent hair care line.
– She launched Spectacular Weave Wash in 2017.
– Eggcellent is 98% naturally derived.
– What was the driving force behind your Egg Custard edge control?
– She wanted to be the one-stop shop for hair care.
– When she does edge control, she goes behind it with black gel.
– For someone who is looking to get into the beauty industry, what’s one tip to get started?
– Get a good mentor.
– Talk about how Gems with Jaz was born.
– She became a board-certified performance coach.
– She was raised in the church and wanted to know how to maintain her integrity while delivering the word.
– What’s coming up new?
– Her products have a more uniform look.
– She’s doing a revamp to the company that’s relaunching on June 15th.
– Talk to us about biotin.
– It’s a good hair, skin, and nails vitamin.
– You have to take it consistently.
– Give us one general tip.
– Stay grounded and keep your circle small and tight.

3 Key Points

– You need to learn to do one thing a million ways.
– Get a good mentor, but then pour back into them.
– Stay grounded and keep your circle small and tight.

Tweetable Quotes

“Hair school was a culture shock, I didn’t learn how to braid or quick weave there.”
– “Stay grounded and keep your circle small and tight.”
– “Focus on one or you’re leaving money on the table.”

Resources Mentioned

Instagram: @msjazminejackson
Instagram: @empressdreamdoll

  • Podcasting

Episode 27: From Universal to Showtime with Demetrius McNeal

Episode–27 Summary

During the 27th episode of Hair Biz Radio, Zakiyrah and Mikey interview Demetrius McNeal, aka Showtime a premier fashion and hair photographer in Atlanta.

Show Notes

– What’s going on in Showtime’s world, what made you want to get into the photography industry?
– He was a front gate photographer at Universal Studios.
– When he stopped doing photography at Universal, he started dabbling on his own.
– What did you learn at Universal that you took into your photography?
– He got the eye for photography.
– Clients mostly want perfection today.
– What equipment are you working with now?
– His original camera was a T3I with a 1.4 lens.
– He uses a Mark III camera right now.
– He uses Mac everything.
– He just started doing video.
– When you book clients for a shoot, what’s the proper etiquette that you want your clients to come to a shoot to get the best experience.
– Starting Monday, he’s no longer letting clients control the whole set
– For a client who’s coming to you with a new hair business, what does the process of getting a shoot done?
– Besides newborn and weddings hair is the most expensive type of shoot.
– One photo takes three hours to retouch.
– You have to find a budget, and it has to be realistic – don’t be in a rush.
– He does a contract agreement for everything.
– If you’re in a rush, you have to have the budget to pay a rush fee.
– What is your recommendation for someone who’s looking to do a hair website and they don’t have the budget to shoot every single style of hair.
– He does websites too, so he’s a one-stop shop.
– They should shoot their traditional, regular stuff and anything that’s catchy.
– Don’t try to go over the top.
– Editing takes a long time, don’t expect 24-hour turnaround for images.
– What do you use to perfect your craft?
– YouTube
– Editing DVD classes
– He creates his own instructional DVD’s.
– Where can people find your editing DVD’s?
– Thenextlevelimages.com
– What else do you have coming up?
– He’s going to slow down on photography.
– Beauty, fashion, hair, weddings
– He started his own record label.
– He may relocate to L.A.
– Social media: @nextlevelimages1
– What’s one tip that you would give to someone’s who’s interested in getting into the fashion and beauty photography business.
– Don’t get in for the wrong reason.
– Be in it for the craft.
– Watch YouTube

3 Key Points

– Be sure to have the budget, you don’t want discount hair pictures.
– Be open to the photographer’s creative direction, you don’t know what will look best.
– If you want to get into the business you need to educate yourself.

Tweetable Quotes

You can never know enough when it comes to photography.
Most clients want perfection today.
If someone tells you they can shoot hair for $500, run!

Resources Mentioned

thenextlevelimages – Demetrius’ website

  • Podcasting

Episode 26: Becoming a Curly Hair Expert with Soyini Thwaites

Episode – 26 Summary:

During the 24th episode of Hair Biz Radio, Zakiyrah and Mikey interview Soyini, owner of Salon Soy, curly hair expert, mother of three, business owner and salon owner.

Show Notes:

– Soyini’s background:
– When she was getting ready to go to school, her mom pushed her in the direction of cosmetology school.
– She was thankful that her mother recognized her gift.
– What was your experience in cosmetology school?
– She started wearing her hair curly back then, before it was popular.
– The focus was taking curly hair and making it straight.
– It’s a different time, people are embracing their curly hair.
– What was the change that allowed women to embrace their curls?
– In the 70’s women wore curly hair, then they felt they needed to conform for the workplace.
– Women got fed up with hiding their natural hair and damaging it.
– The products have changed and gotten better.
– The mainstream probably didn’t know that many people of color have curly hair.
– It’s less about ethnicity and more about the texture of the hair.
– Talk to us about some of the techniques that you picked up outside of cosmetology school.
– That’s mostly everything.
– Cosmetology taught her theory, basic hair theory.
– When she got into the salon she got product knowledge, cuts, colors, etc.
– She’s worked in all kinds of salons, multi-cultural.
– How did your experience prepare you for owning your own salon?
– It prepared her for dealing with different clientele.
– She can cut anyone’s hair.
– You can’t just watch YouTube, you need to go to cosmetology school.
– Use YouTube for inspiration.
– What was the transition like going from someone else’s salon to building your own?
– She started in 2008 when the market was crashing.
– She took away a lot of policy, commission vs. booth rent.
– She wanted consistency across the board.
– She wanted the clients to have the same experience across the board.
– Times have changed, a lot of people want ownership of their time, setting their own hours.
– What was your reasoning behind closing down the salon and doing the suite?
– The stress, the salon used to be her second home.
– How do you keep balance when you have kids and a business?
– Exercise
– Write out your schedule and delegate work.
– Get other people on-board to help you.
– You can’t do anything without your health.
– She’s at the Salon Lofts in Decatur
– What do you tell a client who doesn’t know how to manage her curl pattern?
– You have to find out what that means to her, will she only wear her hair curly or go back and forth?
– She doesn’t subscribe to the different curl texture pattern labeling.
– What are some of your favorite products for someone who wants to embrace their curls?
– She asks what the goal is with their hair, what do you see in your head?
– Each day your curls are going to change.
– She prefers to use water-based products – mousses and foams.
– What about curl training?
– Heat changes your curl structure.
– You should probably stay away from heat, use certain techniques and products.
– You should give a product 3-6 months for your hair to acclimate.
– What styles do you love?
– Working with different fashion colors, neons.
– She doesn’t push people to keep their natural hair if they don’t want to.
– What advice do you give to people who want to start their own salon?
– Take your time, do your research.
– You can’t do everything.
– Find her @salonsoy

3 Key Points

– Natural styles have changed because partially because hair products have greatly improved.
– Most techniques are learned outside of cosmetology school, but school is still necessary.
– You can’t do everything yourself, build your salon army.

Tweetable Quotes

– “Stop trying to take everyone as a stylist, niche yourself out.
– “There may never be a balance, something’s going to shift.
– “I don’t push people to keep their natural hair if they don’t want to.

Resources Mentioned

Salon Soy Website
Headspace App – meditation app

  • Podcasting

Episode 25: True Beauty Comes From Within with Sandye Lomax

Episode – 25 Summary:

During the 25th episode of Hair Biz Radio, Zakiyrah and Mikey interview Sandye Lomax of the Beauty Fetish, professional makeup artist, certified eyelash extension expert and educator and licensed hair stylist.

Show Notes:

– How did Sandye get started?
– She had long legs growing up so she started modeling to make her legs work for her.
– Started working for the state of Maryland as a disability specialist because of her brother with epilepsy.
– In her mid-thirties she realized that her passion was making people look and feel good.
– What brought Sandye to Atlanta?
– She had a cousin who lived there and thought she’d like it.
– She came, stayed and built the brand.
– What was the process of choosing a cosmetology school?
– She needed to find a school where she could still travel and grow.
– She did it according to hours.
– What are some self-taught techniques?
– She learned a lot by sitting in the chair.
– She watched how the hairstylists cut for the Paul Mitchell shows she was in.
– The business part of what she does was self-taught.
– What are some of the things that happened when you started your business that felt like you messed it up.
– She used to think you needed to make a certain amount of money before getting an accountant.
– Trying to figure out if it should be an LLC.
– Keep your business and personal card separate.
– They talk about Beauty Fetish, Sandye’s studio in midtown.
– In cosmetology, it’s all about location.
– Mary J. Blige helped her come up with the name beauty fetish.
– What is the process of getting your business started?
– Her studio is a suite, you have to get what works for you.
– She doesn’t have to pay water and lights, most of the time she does bridal hair.
– How are you balancing entrepreneurship?
– She’s still learning, it’s an ongoing battle.
– She’s learning to put herself first and to say no.
– A lot of people, especially new business owners don’t take health as seriously as they should.
– Take time to recharge and get creative again.
– Talk about the difference between lashes?
– Her clientele has moved from celebrities to the everyday woman and cancer survivors.
– You have to learn who can get what type of lashes.
– Lashes start at like a 7 or 8 and go up to an 18 which is very long.
– Sandye customizes lashes for everyone.
– With hybrid lashes you can mix the mink with the synthetic and create a great look.
– How long will individual lashes work for people?
– Our lashes have the same cycle of growth as our hair.
– Don’t be alarmed if you’re getting a full set of lashes and you see one shed tomorrow.
– For some, around 4-5 weeks you’ll be going past the touchup range and into another full set.
– Sandye talks about her training and teaching others in the art of lashes.
– You don’t just come in and learn lashes, there’s so much more too it.
– You have to know what kind of lash to put on a lash.
– You need to learn care, sanitation, anatomy of the eye, etc.
– You can’t just practice on a mannequin, you have to practice on a human.
– What is the experience you’ll get at The Beauty Fetish when you walk in the door?
– It’s a pleasant, secured, private environment.
– It’s warm and inviting in a comfortable environment.
– She has a phone that’s strictly for business, and finding a balance is challenging.
– Sandye talks about the Beauty Fetish Show.
– She wanted to create a platform where people can tell their stories.
– People share their testimonies and stories on the show, but in the end they talk about beauty.
– What’s one of your favorite products you can’t live without?
– A rose lip balm at Sephora.
– Rihanna’s Fenty line, the lip-gloss.
– Lashes – You feel like you can just put on lip balm and go.
– Aveeno cleansing pads.
– Drinking water
– She now sees the difference in her skin.
– Engraved eyeliner by MAC
– What is one tip for someone looking to get into the beauty industry?
– Planning – find out what is going to set you apart from the rest.

3 Key Points

– The training and the tools matter when it comes to lashes.
– Finding balance between life and business and making that clear to clients is challenging, but possible.
– You have to find out what makes you and your brand different – you have to learn the business side.

Tweetable Quotes

“My mantra is true beauty starts within.”
“A lot of pressure comes from owning a salon, it’s constant work.”
“When your body says slow down, you need to learn to slow down.”
“The average person isn’t wearing 100% mink lashes.”

Resources Mentioned

Beauty Fetish Website

  • Podcasting

Episode 24: Building my Business on Brows with Pallena Foreman

Episode 24 Summary:

During the 24th episode of Hair Biz Radio, Zakiyrah and Mikey interview Pallena Foreman, owner of Brow Bar ATL to talk about everything beauty.

Show Notes:

– Pallena grew up in the beauty industry and her father was a barber.
– At the age of 16, Pallena started doing makeup because a woman at her church was a celebrity makeup artist.
– Pallena learned makeup on Youtube and then went to cosmetology school to gain a firm foundation.
– When you have a vision, write it down and make it plain.
– When she quit her job, her parents turned their guest room into a studio for her.
– July 8th, 2017 was the grand opening of Brow Bar ATL in Jonesboro, Georgia.
– Pallena discusses what she looks for in the people who she employs.
– Pallena provides some tips for building a clientele base.
– Client follow-up is important, Pallena discusses her methods for keeping in touch when the initial service is over.
– Check out Pallena’s 1-1 makeup classes to learn how to do your own makeup.
– When you’re consistent in your work and get to know people, the success will come.
– Don’t upcharge celebrities, they won’t be back.
– Pallena discusses the products she uses and recommends.
– The first steps you need to take to start your business.

3 Key Points

– Employ the right people who already have a clientele base.
– Be consistent in your work and the success will come.
– Write down your business idea and get it registered, then go from there.

Tweetable Quotes

“Entrepreneurship is an emotional rollercoaster, especially when it’s your baby.”
“You never know who’s in the room and you are your own walking billboard.”
“Your card is your key into the door, if your face is on your card they’ll remember you.”

Resources Mentioned

Bookbrowbaratl.as.me – Pallena’s site
Find Pallena on Instagram @BROWBARATL
Contact Pallena at browbaratl@gmail.com

Hair Biz Radio © 2017